Home / Technology / VHS, RIP
Print Friendly and PDF


Posted on July 23, 2016

By Iain Paul

A company in Japan only recently realized it was time to stop making Video Home System machines—commonly known as VHS.

Japan-based Funai announced earlier in July that it would cease production of its VHS player, which was sold under various brands worldwide. The company said it decided to cease production due to difficulties in acquiring components, according to Japanese-language Nikkei. The near non-existent market for the ancient home entertainment technology was also

Existing historical records of the VHS are distorted and grainy, but here’s what I was able to piece together.

The VHS player was a kind of technology from the late 20th-century known as a video cassette recorder, or VCR. The device used an electro-mechanical process to display or record audio and video via a thin strip of plastic film known as tape. The production of VHS tapes officially ended in 2008.

In its heyday, the VCR was considered a technological marvel since it allowed home users to record broadcast television shows, similar to how we use DVRs today.

By the mid-1980s, Hollywood embraced the format releasing major movies on video cassettes that were then bought or rented from physical retail stores. Records from that time indicate one popular VHS tape chain was known as “the Blockbuster.”

The VCR was a finicky technology, however. The machines would often chew up malformed tapes, and they had mechanical parts that required regular cleaning. Many players also came with programmable timers that were confusing and indecipherable.

(For the rest of the article, click the link.)

Continue Reading on www.pcworld.com

Print Friendly and PDF

Posting Policy:
We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse. Read more.

Comments are closed.